Four great art lectures


Invite Mark Dahle to your group to present a dynamic lecture on art. Here are some lectures he has presented recently that could be given to your group.


Art Collecting:
What Makes Art Valuable


Some paintings are worth more than ten houses in California on the coast. What makes these paintings so valuable?

You'll probably be surprised at the answer – it's not what most people think.

This entertaining and helpful lecture will let you know what's going on with current prices for contemporary art – and how a painting can be worth more than $100 million.


Art Collecting:
Frauds and Thieves


Everybody likes a good crime story. Unless they're in it.

You don't want to end up in a newspaper headline like Steven Spielberg did: "Stolen Norman Rockwell painting found in Spielberg collection."

Even an artist as great as Michelangelo tried to cheat people at the start of his career by selling things he had carved and pretending they were antiquities. Become aware of some of the pitfalls of collecting in this entertaining lecture.


Art Collecting:
Nazis and Wartime


Sometimes when you buy a painting, all you've done is thrown away your money. The painting still belongs to someone else.

Some of California's biggest art institutions have purchased art that they later lost in court. Learn why individuals and museums are losing art from their collections to prior owners, and what you can do to minimize your risk.

You'll get a lot out of this thought-provoking talk even if you don't collect art.


Art Collecting:
A to Z


In the first part of this lecture, Mark Dahle will give three helpful questions that will help you decide if you should buy a particular piece of art when you can't make up your mind.

Then he'll address several traps you'll want to avoid as you invest in art -- traps that you may not hear about from your art dealer.

One example? Many artists use assistants. A painting recently attributed to Leonardo da Vinci was valued at $100 million or more. When people thought it was painted by Leonardo's best assistant, it sold for $1,000. If paintings in your collection have been created by assistants, that's something worth thinking about! How will future generations value your assistant-created work?

This entertaining lecture will give you lots to think about while you are investing in art.


If you would like Mark to present one or more of these talks to your group, please write MarkDahle@aol.com.


Mark Dahle has been collecting art for 40 years. He has been a photographer for 35 years, and has been a painter for 20 years. He has had five one-person shows, in Portland, Oregon; Chicago; Escanaba, Michigan; and San Diego. Mark owned a gallery in La Jolla for 2 1/2 years before moving it to the web. He regularly travels to art events, and in the past 12 months he has been to the Venice Biennale, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, and ArtPrize.

 

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Other pages you might be interested in:

Art Basel in Switzerland
Art Basel Miami Beach
ArtPrize in Grand Rapids, MI

New York Art Galleries

Venice Biennale 2011
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Mark Dahle Biography and FAQs

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Abstract painting copyright Mark Dahle 2011

Abstract painting copyright Mark Dahle 2011

Abstract painting copyright Mark Dahle 2011

Abstract painting copyright Mark Dahle 2011